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 Philadelphia Inquirer - Scarfo Trial 87

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PostSubject: Philadelphia Inquirer - Scarfo Trial 87   Tue Feb 10, 2009 8:58 am

WITNESSES CAST AS LIARS BY DEFENSE IN SCARFO TRIAL
==================================================
Philadelphia Inquirer, The (PA)-December 11, 1987
Author: Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer

In closing arguments that portrayed mobsters-turned-informants Nicholas Caramandi and Thomas DelGiorno as cunning liars, attorneys for reputed mob boss Nicodemo Scarfo and four associates yesterday asked a federal court jury to acquit their clients of drug charges.

Attorney Robert F. Simone, who represents Scarfo, argued that the two key government witnesses had accused the defendants of committing crimes in order to avoid prosecution themselves for the many crimes they committed before they began cooperating with law enforcement authorities.

"The source of this evidence . . . is so polluted, so corrupt, that it almost makes one get sick," said Simone during his 50-minute closing argument. "If you choose not to believe DelGiorno and Caramandi, I submit you cannot convict any defendant on any charges."

And Oscar B. Goodman, the attorney for reputed underboss Philip "Crazy Phil" Leonetti, said the jury should acquit the defendants if they have a reasonable doubt about the truthfulness of Caramandi and DelGiorno.

"If you can't tell who's telling the truth, then they haven't proven their case beyond a reasonable doubt," Goodman said. "I'm not sure the prosecutors know what the truth is. There's no corroboration of what Caramandi and DelGiorno said about my client."

Scarfo, Leonetti, alleged captain Francis "Faffy" Iannarella and soldiers Salvatore "Chuckie" Merlino and Charles "Charlie White" Iannece are charged with conspiring to control the importation and sale of the chemical needed to make methamphetamine.

The five defendants are accused of taking control of three drug operations by extorting a "street tax" from the drug wholesalers in return for allowing them to engage in criminal activity, and by then dictating to whom the chemical phenyl-2-propanone, or P-2-P, could be sold.

DelGiorno and Caramandi testified during the trial that Scarfo approved the plan to extort money from the drug wholesalers and, along with the other defendants, received a share of the money.

The two informants have admitted committing hundreds of crimes in the past, and have pleaded guilty to some of those crimes. Each faces a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison and $250,000 in fines in return for his cooperation. The government also has promised to relocate them and give them new identities under the federal witness-protection program.

Prosecutors Michael L. Levy and Barry Gross told the jury that the two men's testimony was believable because their plea agreements would be nullified and they could be prosecuted for all crimes - including murders - if they lie during any of their court appearances.

"The penalty - if they lied - is probably the electric chair or life imprisonment," said Levy.

Gross agreed that Caramandi and DelGiorno "are absolutely horrible, despicable people," but said, "We didn't choose these men as witnesses. . . . They were chosen by these defendants to become part of their thing, La Cosa Nostra, the Mafia."

But Simone hit hard at the plea agreements between the government and the witnesses, and noted that Caramandi and DelGiorno, while in the custody of the FBI, are not being held in prison.

In a reference to the fact that the jury has been sequestered at a hotel during the trial, he asked the jury: "Isn't it ironic that as a result of the testimony of Thomas DelGiorno and Nicholas Caramandi, you are the ones that are locked up and they are free to do just about anything they want?"

Simone also urged the jury to put aside what they have learned about the defendants' reputations, and said, "It boils down to whether you have the guts to do the right thing. . . . Are you strong enough to resist the press, to resist the public outcry for Scarfo's scalp?"

PHOTO

PHOTO (1)

1. Nicodemo Scarfo; Accused of drug-trade scheme

Edition: FINAL
Section: LOCAL
Page: B01

Index Terms: DRUG VIOLATION PHILADELPHIA ORGANIZED CRIME
Record Number: 8703160649
Copyright (c) 1987 The Philadelphia Inquirer
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PostSubject: Re: Philadelphia Inquirer - Scarfo Trial 87   Tue Feb 10, 2009 9:01 am

DEFENSE ASKS SCARFO DISMISSAL SAYS HE WASN'T A 'DRUG KINGPIN'
==================================================
Philadelphia Inquirer, The (PA)-December 10, 1987
Author: Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer

The attorney for reputed mob boss Nicodemo Scarfo asked a federal judge yesterday to throw out all drug charges against his client, saying that the government might have shown Scarfo's involvement in an extortion scheme but that it had failed to prove he ran a drug operation.

"The government has proved, if anything, the possibility of making out a crime of extortion . . . not the specific crimes charged," said defense attorney Robert F. Simone. "Mr. Scarfo was not the organizer, supervisor or manager of this drug operation."

U.S. District Judge Thomas N. O'Neill Jr. is expected to rule this morning on Simone's request and on similar motions presented by attorneys for the four alleged mobsters on trial with Scarfo on federal drug charges. Closing arguments also are expected today.

Scarfo, reputed underboss Philip "Crazy Phil" Leonetti, alleged captain Francis "Faffy" Iannarella and soldiers Salvatore "Chuckie" Merlino and Charles "Charlie White" Iannece are charged with conspiring to control the importation and sale of the chemical needed to make methamphetamine.

The five defendants are accused of taking control of three drug operations by extorting a "street tax" from the drug wholesalers in return for allowing them to engage in criminal activity, and by then dictating to whom the chemical - phenyl-2-propanone, or P-2-P - could be sold.

The most serious charge faced by Scarfo, Leonetti, Iannarella and Merlino is that they violated the federal "drug kingpin" statute by operating a continuing criminal enterprise, an offense that carries upon conviction a maximum sentence of life imprisonment without parole.

Simone and other defense attorneys argued that the government simply had not proven that their clients held supervisory positions in a drug operation.

"Scarfo is not a drug kingpin," said Simone. "He may be the boss of a La Cosa Nostra family, but he is not a . . . drug kingpin. I think the same argument can be applied to all the defendants."

Prosecutor Michael L. Levy of the U.S. Organized Crime Strike Force, however, argued that the evidence would show the scheme began as a shakedown plan, but ultimately the defendants ended up with control over the distribution of P-2-P.

"We have gone beyond extortion," said Levy. "We have a direction, a control of the flow of a controlled substance. . . . We are now in the heart of a drug conspiracy."

Levy further contended that Scarfo, as the leader of the Philadelphia-South Jersey crime family, had to have approved the drug scheme.

"We are dealing with the boss' imprimateur," he told O'Neill. "Without it, it could not go forward. . . . Nothing in this organization could go forward without the boss' approval."

Edition: FINAL
Section: LOCAL
Page: B01

Index Terms: EXTORTION DRUG VIOLATION ORGANIZED CRIME
;
PHILADELPHIA
Record Number: 8703160377
Copyright (c) 1987 The Philadelphia Inquirer


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PostSubject: Re: Philadelphia Inquirer - Scarfo Trial 87   Tue Feb 10, 2009 9:02 am

DRUG DEALER DEFIED THE MOB AND SON WAS SHOT, JURY TOLD
==================================================
Philadelphia Inquirer, The (PA)-December 9, 1987
Author: Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer

Convicted drug trafficker Steven "Steakie" Vento sent a message to the mob last year that he would not pay them a share of his drug profits. His son was shot and wounded a short time later, according to testimony given and tapes played yesterday in U.S. District Court.

"Tell 'em I said go . . . himself and everybody connected to him. . . . I don't give nothing to anybody," Vento was heard saying during an April 1986 conversation with an associate, Joseph "Mousey" Massamino. "And tell him if I don't have $10,000 from him Tuesday morning, I'm gonna do what I gotta do."

Testifying as the seventh government witness in the drug trial of reputed mob boss Nicodemo "Little Nicky" Scarfo and four associates, Vento said that the message was intended for defendant Charles "Charlie White" Iannece, the mobster who allegedly demanded the protection payments, and for Scarfo.

He told the jury that he sent the message during a telephone conversation

from the federal prison at Lewisburg, where he was serving an 18-year sentence, after learning that a shakedown demand had been made of him and his partner in the drug business, Angelo DiTullio of Mantua, N.J.

According to the tape played for the jury, Massamino sounded surprised that Vento would send such a threatening message. "You serious?" he asked Vento.

"I'm serious as . . . cancer," Vento replied. "You tell him that's the way it is, OK? Would you send that message? . . . Tell him that's what I want.

Because that's for his protection. . . . I'm sure he'll know what I'm talking about . . . because that's the same message I got."

Vento further told the jury that about a month later, his son, Steven Jr., then 18, was shot in the head but survived.

And according to a tape of a May 28, 1986, phone conversation, Vento told DiTullio to tell mobster Nicholas "Nicky Crow" Caramandi, who was Iannece's partner and is now a government informant, exactly how he felt about the shooting.

"You tell him, all three of them are held responsible, you hear me?" Vento said on the tape. "And tell them if they don't find out who did this, they're held responsible." In his testimony yesterday, Vento said the three people were Scarfo, Caramandi and Iannece.

Vento took the stand on the third day of testimony as the government continued efforts to link Scarfo and his co-defendants to a conspiracy to control the importation and sale of phenyl-2-propanone, or P-2-P, the chemical needed to manufacture methamphetamine.

Scarfo, reputed underboss Philip "Crazy Phil" Leonetti, alleged captain Francis "Faffy" Iannarella and soldiers Salvatore Merlino and Iannece are accused of taking control of drug operations allegedly headed by DiTullio and John A. Renzulli, of the 1700 block of Porter Street, and Michael Forte, of the 800 block of Catharine Street, both in South Philadelphia.

The government contends that Vento's testimony and his taped conversations corroborate the existence of the "street tax" paid by criminals to the mob in return for permission to carry out illegal activity.

Prosecutors also hope that Vento has corroborated in part the testimony of Caramandi, who took the stand on Monday and said that the decision was made to kill the younger Vento because he had been "shooting his mouth off that he wasn't going to pay us."

Under questioning by prosecutor Barry Gross of the U.S. Organized Crime Strike Force, Vento said he began cooperating with law enforcement authorities after he and his son were arrested last July following a botched attempt to

break him out of prison.

The Ventos were each sentenced to five-year prison terms for the attempted escape.

Edition: FINAL
Section: LOCAL
Page: B01

Index Terms: PHILADELPHIA DRUG VIOLATION ASSAULT ORGANIZED
;
CRIME
Record Number: 8703160198
Copyright (c) 1987 The Philadelphia Inquirer

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PostSubject: Re: Philadelphia Inquirer - Scarfo Trial 87   Tue Feb 10, 2009 9:12 am

BOSS WITH DEPLETION OF SCARFO RANKS, POWER MAY SHIFT TO 'SEDATE' TYPE
==================================================
Philadelphia Inquirer, The (PA)-May 10, 1987
Author: Daniel R. Biddle and George Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writers

He had moved the Rolls-Royce out of the garage to make way for the caterers. His yacht, Casablanca, swayed gently at its moorings on the Intracoastal Waterway. The diminutive man with watchful eyes stood in his doorway in Fort Lauderdale and greeted his guests.

A thousand miles north, people in Philadelphia and Atlantic City might be wearing bulky coats and heavy boots, but on Jan. 4, 1986, Nicodemo Scarfo basked in the glory of 78-degree weather and the confidence of having reached the pinnacle of power in his world.

From a discreet distance, police and FBI agents watched as the reputed members of the Philadelphia-area La Cosa Nostra family arrived.

"Nicky was in the doorway," Officer Joseph Moran of the Pennsylvania State Police would testify 13 months later. Several of the men kissed Scarfo on the cheek. "It is a known showing of respect for persons that are higher up in the organization," Moran testified. "Just like - like I would salute my superior."

Sixteen months later, Scarfo and many of the guests who were at that party in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., are behind bars.

Some are serving prison terms; others await trial on charges ranging from racketeering to extortion. Two, Thomas DelGiorno and Nicholas Caramandi, have become valued government witnesses against the others. With last week's federal-court conviction of Scarfo for attempted extortion, law enforcement officials in New Jersey and Pennsylvania are saying that the bloody reign of the man known as "Little Nicky" or "the little guy" may be over.

While wary of making any firm predictions, those officials said last week in interviews that in all likelihood, whoever fills the void left by Scarfo would seem mild-mannered by comparison.

"What you'll see is one of these older guys who know that the only way to survive is to keep a low profile," said Capt. Frank Friel, who heads the Philadelphia Police Department's organized-crime unit.

If a new boss emerges, it will be someone "sedate and settled," Friel said, like Scarfo's predecessor, the late Angelo Bruno, whose 20-year reign was marked by little violence. "It'll be a low-key kind of guy, who doesn't need the notoriety, the drugs, the guns and the women."

A successor might rise from the remaining ranks of the Scarfo group, Friel said. But he stressed that the group's level of activity was bound to wane

because it faces "a unique situation, a problem that no other (organized- crime) family has . . . complete decimation."

"The prosecutions that have taken place recently, and that will take place, will have a devastating effect on organized crime in this area," said Joel M. Friedman, attorney in charge of the U.S. Organized Crime Strike Force office here. "At this stage, I would think things would be more peaceful."

A movement toward less violence could be initiated from New York City, several officials theorized. "The general consensus in law enforcement is, in order for Scarfo to do what he did, he had to have the backing of at least one of the New York families," said G. Alan Bailey, chief counsel to the Pennsylvania Crime Commission. Thus, Bailey reasoned, the same forces might support a change of direction.

Friel, Bailey and other officials say several reputed crime figures could rise to prominence if Scarfo is in prison for a long time:

* Anthony "Blond Babe" Pungitore, whom Friel described as representing an older, now-inactive generation of La Cosa Nostra figures. Pungitore is the father of Joseph "Joey Pung" Pungitore, who is one of several alleged Scarfo family members facing charges in the 1984 slaying of Salvatore Testa.

* Santo Idone, 67, formerly of Brookhaven, Pa. Said to have taken up permanent residence in St. Petersburg, Fla., in 1978, Idone was described in a 1983 Crime Commission report as a "probable" captain in the Scarfo family; DelGiorno confirmed this to authorities after he began cooperating last November.

* Nicholas "Nicky Buck" Piccolo, 82, described by the Crime Commission in 1983 as Scarfo's uncle and his longtime consigliere or adviser. DelGiorno has said this was still Piccolo's status last year. The 1987 Crime Commission report says Piccolo has two brothers and a nephew who are all mob soldiers.

* Alfred Iezzi, 76, now living in Florida, according to officials. DelGiorno has told authorities that as of April 1986, Iezzi was a capo in the Scarfo family. Iezzi was described in Crime Commission reports as a friend of Angelo Bruno.

* Pasquale Anthony "Patty Specks" Martirano, 57, described in the 1987 report as head of the Scarfo family's northern New Jersey faction. Martirano has "the respect of the New York L.C.N. families (and) of the old-time Bruno loyalists . . . and has been adept at maintaining a low profile," says the report, issued last month.

Law enforcement officials say that the fall of Scarfo and those around him could trigger more activity by newer forces such as motorcycle gangs and groups with roots in a variety of ethnic communities - such as Korean, Vietnamese and Jamaican.

But the same officials are quick to point out that traditional organized crime will still have an edge in the Philadelphia-Atlantic City territory once purportedly ruled by Scarfo.

Even if Scarfo and his associates "are all found guilty in all their trials," said Steven V. Turner, deputy counsel to the Crime Commission, ''organized crime is not going to cease in Philadelphia. . . . La Cosa Nostra will survive because of the market for vice."

Prosecutor Friedman agreed. "At this stage, I would say that the most major organized-crime group is still La Cosa Nostra," he said. "Given its power base, and the extent of the contacts it has had for years, given its interrelationship with labor unions and with the political process, it has built up a substantial power base.

"Prosecutions have successfully eroded a lot of that power base, but it still has a substantial head start over other criminal organizations."

*

A look at what has happened to members of the guest list for the 1986 party in Fort Lauderdale offers a stunning sense of just how far the combined forces of federal, state and local law enforcement have gone in efforts to dismantle the Scarfo organization.

During their round-the-clock surveillance of Scarfo's home, Officer Moran and his colleagues identified these men entering the house: reputed capo Frank "Faffy" Iannarella, reputed underboss Philip "Crazy Phil" Leonetti, Salvatore "Chuckie" Merlino and his brother Lawrence Merlino, Nicholas ''Nick the Blade" Virgilio, Saul Kane, Joseph Ligambi, Joseph Pungitore, Salvatore Grande and his brother Joseph Grande, brothers Philip Narducci and Frank Narducci Jr., Charles "Charlie White" Iannece, Nicholas Caramandi and Thomas DelGiorno.

Virgilio is charged with Scarfo in the 1978 murder of a part-time Atlantic County municipal judge, Edwin Helfant. Of the others, only three - Ligambi, DelGiorno and Caramandi - do not face criminal charges. The others are accused of racketeering. Leonetti, Salvatore Grande, Pungitore and Iannarella are also charged with assisting in the 1984 murder of Salvatore Testa.

DelGiorno and Caramandi have pleaded guilty to racketeering, have admitted participating in mob murders during Scarfo's reign, and have been promised prison sentences of no more than 20 years in return for testimony against Scarfo and the men around him.

Edition: FINAL
Section: LOCAL
Page: B01

Index Terms: NAMELIST; ORGANIZED CRIME PHILADELPHIA NAMELIST
Record Number: 8701290273
Copyright (c) 1987 The Philadelphia Inquirer
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PostSubject: Re: Philadelphia Inquirer - Scarfo Trial 87   Tue Feb 10, 2009 9:14 am

==================================================
SCARFO CHARGED AS DRUG LORD \ U.S. SAYS LOCAL MOB SOUGHT TO RUN MARKET
==================================================
Philadelphia Inquirer, The (PA)-June 19, 1987
Author: Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer

Reputed mob boss Nicodemo Scarfo and five associates were charged yesterday with importing and selling large amounts of the essential chemical needed to manufacture methamphetamine in what authorities said reflected an unprecedented effort by local mob leaders to control the drug market.

Twenty-two other people were named in the sweeping federal indictment, and the government immediately moved to seize about $5 million in assets from the defendants, including Scarfo's $500,000 Fort Lauderdale home and a 40-foot boat worth $100,000.

The boat, the Casablanca Usual Suspects, had been docked behind Scarfo's Fort Lauderdale home, Casablanca South, but it was not there yesterday afternoon when U.S. marshals went to seize it. In court documents, the government identified Philadelphia disc jockey Jerry Blavat as the registered owner of the boat but said that Scarfo was the "true owner."

Blavat, a longtime figure in local entertainment, could not be reached for comment. His attorney, Jacob Kossman, said Blavat sold the boat to Scarfo in 1985 or 1986 for $70,000 but still held the title pending full payment.

Prosecutors said that while lower-level organized-crime members have become involved in drug trafficking, yesterday's indictment was the first time that local La Cosa Nostra leaders have ever been charged with trying to control a

drug business.

"Contrary to public perception, the indictment alleges and we will prove that the mob is deeply involved in drug trafficking," said Barry Gross, a prosecutor with the U.S. Organized Crime Strike Force. "This is a major, major P-2-P importing ring, and the LCN (La Cosa Nostra) was trying to control it."

P-2-P is the chemical used to make methamphetamine.

Wayne G. Davis, special agent in charge of the FBI in Philadelphia, said during a news conference that the New York-based commission that governs all U.S. organized-crime activity has traditionally barred mob families from trafficking in drugs.

As a result, he said, the indictment has put Scarfo and his associates ''not only on the wrong side of the law but on the wrong side of the LCN

commission as well."

The indictment, which was returned by the grand jury Wednesday but sealed until yesterday, was just the latest legal problem facing Scarfo, who could be sentenced to up to life imprisonment if convicted of the most serious charge in the indictment - conducting a continuing criminal enterprise. Scarfo also is charged with importation, distribution and attempted importation of P-2-P, and conspiracy.

Scarfo, 58, allegedly has headed the Philadelphia-South Jersey crime family since 1981. He was convicted last month of conspiring with City Councilman Leland M. Beloff and Beloff's top aide to extort $1 million from developer Willard G. Rouse 3d.

He also is awaiting trial in New Jersey on racketeering charges and for the 1978 murder of Somers Point Municipal Court Judge Edwin Helfant, and in Philadelphia for the 1984 slaying of mobster Salvatore Testa.

Michael L. Levy, an attorney with the strike force who will prosecute the case with Gross, said the government was trying to seize Scarfo's property under a 1984 law that allows the government to seize assets earned through a

drug enterprise or used in the commission of a drug felony.

The boat, according to court documents, was used by Scarfo last August as he discussed and planned to import P-2-P, or phenyl-2-propanone, which is an essential ingredient used to make methamphetamine, commonly known as ''speed" or "crank."

The indictment charged that Scarfo, reputed underbosses Philip "Crazy Phil" Leonetti and Salvatore Merlino, captain Francis "Faffy" Iannarella and soldiers Charles Iannece and Ralph Staino tried to gain control of the lucrative methamphetamine trade by cornering the market on P-2-P.

The crime family essentially took over drug operations headed by John A. Renzulli, 39, of the 1700 block of Porter Street; Angelo DiTullio, 48, of Mantua, N.J., and Michael Forte, 47, of the 800 block of Catharine Street, who is now serving a prison sentence for operating a drug ring, the indictment stated.

The mob accomplished the plan by first requiring P-2-P traffickers to pay a ''street tax" to the crime family in return for permission to sell the chemical and then by dictating to whom the P-2-P wholesalers could sell the chemical, the indictment said.

DiTullio allegedly imported 155 gallons of P-2-P, hidden in air compressors and barbecue grills, from Germany and Belgium, and then sold the chemical to Renzulli. Forte was identified as the "middleman" in the sale of some of that chemical.

The Scarfo crime family then completely took over DiTullio's importation operation and directly imported about 50 gallons of P-2-P in August 1986, and sold it to Renzulli, the indictment said.

Renzulli allegedly manufactured at least 340 pounds of methamphetamine at five laboratory sites in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. The crime family then purchased 100 gallons of P-2-P in October in Belgium, but the chemical was seized by Belgian authorities in March, authorities said.

Joel M. Friedman, attorney in charge of the strike force, said the 205 gallons of P-2-P would have been capable of producing more than $130 million worth of methamphetamine.

In addition to Scarfo, those named in the indictment and the charges they face are:

Leonetti, 34, of Atlantic City; conspiracy, importation, distribution of P- 2-P, attempted importation of P-2-P, conducting a continuing criminal enterprise.

Merlino, 47, of Longport, N.J.; conspiracy, conducting a continuing

criminal enterprise.

Iannarella, 44, of the 2000 block of South Beechwood Street, Philadelphia; conspiracy, importation, distribution of P-2-P, attempted importation of P-2- P, conducting a continuing criminal enterprise.

Iannece, 52, 1100 block of Wolf Street, Philadelphia; conspiracy, importation and distribution of P-2-P, attempted importation.

Staino, 55, of the 3100 block of South 13th Street, Philadelphia; conspiracy, importation and attempted importation of P-2-P.

Renzulli, 39, 1700 block of Porter Street, Philadelphia; conspiracy, manufacture, possession of P-2-P with intent to manufacture, distribution of P-2-P, conducting a continuing criminal enterprise.

DiTullio, 48, of Mantua, N.J.; conspiracy, importation, distribution of P- 2-P and conducting a continuing criminal enterprise.

Forte, 47, 800 block of Catharine Street, Philadelphia; conspiracy, distribution of P-2-P and methamphetamine.

Michael Borelli, 40, 2600 block of Bancroft Street, Philadelphia; conspiracy and manufacture.

Peter Donato, 34, 2600 block of South Sheridan Street, Philadelphia; conspiracy and manufacture.

John Small, 41, of Wenonah, N.J.; conspiracy and manufacture.

Anthony Leo, 39, 900 block of South 10th Street, Philadelphia; conspiracy.

Vincent Peraino, 49, 3200 block of South Broad Street, Philadelphia; conspiracy.

Gerald Esposito, 100 block of Trent Road, Washington Township, N.J.; conspiracy and manufacture.

Thomas Esposito, 43, 2300 block of South 17th Street, Philadelphia; conspiracy and distribution of methamphetamine.

Joseph Liberio, 41, 1100 block of West Moyamensing Avenue, Philadelphia; conspiracy.

John R. Renzulli, 40, 2000 block of South Newkirk Street, Philadelphia; conspiracy, manufacture and possession of P-2-P with intent to distribute and intent to manufacture methamphetamine.

Louis DiFranco, 31, 1800 block of South Dover Street, Philadelphia; conspiracy, manufacture and possession of methamphetamine with intent to distribute.

Anthony Renzulli, 33, 2500 block of South Mildred Street, Philadelphia; conspiracy.

Dominic Picuri, 39, 1000 block of Latona Street, Philadelphia; conspiracy.

Joseph Kelly, 31, 3800 block of New York Avenue, Pennsauken, N.J.; conspiracy, importation and attempted importation of P-2-P.

Edmond Gifford, 42, 6500 block of Girard Avenue, Philadelphia; conspiracy, importation and attempted importation of P-2-P.

John Romolini, 44, 1400 block of South Beulah Street, Philadelphia; conspiracy, importation and distribution of P-2-P.

Peter Mueller, 49, of Boston; conspiracy and importation.

Joseph Tenuto, 39, 2700 block of South Beulah Street, Philadelphia; conspiracy and possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine.

Vincent Bartels, 52, of Paris; conspiracy and importation.

Joseph Massamino, 37, of the 700 block of Mountain Avenue, Philadelphia; conspiracy.

PHOTO

PHOTO (4)

1. Nicodemo Scarfo; Reputed head of crime family

2. The boat Casablanca Usual Suspects, docked at Scarfo's Fort Lauderdale

home, Casablanca South.

3. Jerry Blavat; Retains title to the boat

4. Francis "Faffy" Iannarella; Accused of moving in on P-2-P market

Edition: FINAL
Section: LOCAL
Page: A01

Index Terms: NAMELIST;
DRUG VIOLATION NAMELIST AGE ORGANIZED CRIME
;
NJ PA PHILADELPHIA
Record Number: 8702070448
Copyright (c) 1987 The Philadelphia Inquire
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